Technology, social media and mental health: Part 1 – contributions to psychiatry

by Chris Blackmore and Professor Digby Tantam

 

Last updated: August 2017

 

This module, the first in a two-part series, examines the role of social media in mental health, including an overview of the development of the computer to the small, powerful, hand-held multi-functional devices that are now ubiquitous.

 

It looks at some of the benefits of social media and reviews the vast amount of information online and the implications of this for mental health and for professionals in the field.

 

The module also examines the implications of social media for clinicians as well as for patients, and considers how clinical practice and teaching are being affected by new modes of communication and connection.

 

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Start the module

 

 

If you like this module, you may also be interested in:

 

Technology, social media and mental health: Part 2 – mental health hazards by Chris Blackmore and Professor Digby Tantam

 

Computers, the internet and the World Wide Web: an introduction for the e-therapist by Chris Blackmore and Professor Digby Tantam

 

Computer-aided cognitive behaviour therapy by Dr Lina Gega and Professor Isaac Marks

 

Related blogs:

 

SCPPE (Professional Practice and Ethics) blog: Statement on Monitoring Patients' Online World

 

BJPsych Advances: related articles for CPD Online

 

 

Related Advances articles

 

Download take-home notes to print and annotateDownload take-home notes to print and annotate

 

This module has been substantially revised from the original Technology, social media and mental health module and divided into two parts, both of which include previous and new content.

The second module in this series, Technology, social media and mental health: Part 2 – mental health hazards, looks at the problems of social media and how to practice safely and ethically in an era of increasing social media use.

 

 

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